Sleep and Acid Reflux

Acid Reflux
Wedge Pillow

Our Acid Reflux Wedge Pillow has been expertly designed to reduce
symptoms of Acid Reflux for a more comfortable night’s sleep.

Our Acid Reflux Wedge Pillow has been expertly designed to reduce symptoms of Acid Reflux for a more comfortable night’s sleep.

£59.99

Reviews
4.5/5

FEATURES

Angled wedge shape elevates the upper half of your body to prevent acid leaking out of the stomach

Provides relief from GERD, GORD and Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR)

Made from hypoallergenic materials for a fresher night’s sleep

Removable, machine washable pillow cover included free

Firmness: Medium Firm

£59.99

Reviews
4.5/5

FEATURES

Angled wedge shape elevates the upper half of your body to prevent acid leaking out of the stomach

Provides relief from GERD, GORD and Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR)

Made from hypoallergenic materials for a fresher night’s sleep

Removable, machine washable pillow cover included free

Firmness: Medium Firm

Made in
the UK

Super fast
delivery

Sleep now,
pay later

14 night
sleep trial

2 year
guarantee

Designed to be versatile

Our Acid Reflux Wedge Pillow can be used in various ways

Head, shoulder and torso elevation to relieve acid reflux

Head, shoulder and torso elevation to relieve acid reflux during pregnancy

Leg elevation to take the weight off joints and muscles

Seated back support for comfort when sitting up

What is acid reflux?

Acid Reflux is a burning feeling in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards the throat.

If it happens often, it’s called Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD).

If it happens often and has become severe, it may mean you have Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

0
% of UK adults suffer from acid reflux regularly

What is acid reflux?

Acid Reflux is a burning feeling in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards the throat.

If it happens often, it’s called Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD).

If it happens often and has become severe, it may mean you have Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

0
% of UK adults suffer from acid reflux regularly

Acid reflux during pregnancy

Acid reflux is more common in pregnancy because progesterone, the main hormone of pregnancy, slows your digestive system. That, combined with the pressure of a growing baby, increases the possibility that stomach acid will make its way upward.

To prevent acid reflux during pregnancy, you can:

Eat at small, frequent meals

Avoid greasy, spicy foods, especially close to bedtime.

Avoid milk, it actually increases stomach acid.

Get yourself a Kally Sleep Acid Reflux Wedge Pillow to elevate the upper half of your body to stop stomach acid travelling up towards your throat.

The symptoms

Symptoms of acid reflux are generally temporary but they’re still pretty unpleasant.

According to the NHS, symptoms may include:

Heartburn (burning sensation in the middle of your chest)

An unpleasant sour taste in your mouth

You may also have:

A cough or hiccups that keep coming up

A hoarse voice

Bad breath

Bloating and feeling sick

The common causes

There’s not always an obvious cause, symptoms may develop for a variety of reasons.

Here’s the top 8 recognised causes:

Certain food and drink

Certain food and drink

Such as coffee tomatoes, alcohol, chocolate and fatty or spicy foods

Obesity

Obesity

Extra abdominal fat adds pressure to the stomach forcing acid up into the oesophagus.

Smoking and alcohol

Smoking and alcohol

Smoking and alcohol both contribute to reflux as they lower LES pressure, reduce acid clearance and weaken protective oesophageal functions.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy

Many pregnant women experience acid reflux, it can start at any point, however is most common after 27 weeks.

The uterus gets bigger and increases pressure on the belly. Hormones also tend to be higher, which tends to relax the sphincter.

Increase in hormones

Increase in hormones

Individuals with clinical obesity have more circulating estrogen, which has been linked with GERD symptoms.

Individuals using hormone therapy after menopause also have an increased risk of reflux.

Over the counter and prescription drugs

Over the counter and prescription drugs

Pain relievers like ibuprofen and aspirin. Blood pressure drugs. Certain asthma medications, sedatives, tricyclic anti-depressants and antibiotics can cause acid reflux.

Anxiety and stress

Anxiety and stress

Experts have linked GERD to anxiety and depression.

Hiatus Hernia

Hiatus Hernia

Small hernias of this kind are most often asymptomatic. Larger hiatal hernias are big enough to allow undigested food and stomach acids to reflux into your oesophagus. This means that you’re likely to display the standard symptoms of GERD. 

Certain food and drink

Click for more

Certain food and drink

Such as coffee tomatoes, alcohol, chocolate and fatty or spicy foods

Obesity

Click for more

Obesity

Extra abdominal fat adds pressure to the stomach forcing acid up into the oesophagus.

Smoking and alcohol

Click for more

Smoking and alcohol

Smoking and alcohol both contribute to reflux as they lower LES pressure, reduce acid clearance and weaken protective oesophageal functions.

Pregnancy

Click for more

Pregnancy

Many pregnant women experience acid reflux, it can start at any point, however is most common after 27 weeks.

The uterus gets bigger and increases pressure on the belly. Hormones also tend to be higher, which tends to relax the sphincter.

Increase in hormones

Click for more

Increase in hormones

Individuals with clinical obesity have more circulating estrogen, which has been linked with GERD symptoms.

Individuals using hormone therapy after menopause also have an increased risk of reflux.

Over the counter and prescription drugs

Click for more

Over the counter and prescription drugs

Pain relievers like ibuprofen and aspirin. Blood pressure drugs. Certain asthma medications, sedatives, tricyclic anti-depressants and antibiotics can cause acid reflux.

Anxiety and stress

Click for more

Anxiety and stress

Experts have linked GERD to anxiety and depression.

Hiatus Hernia

Click for more

Hiatus Hernia

Small hernias of this kind are most often asymptomatic. Larger hiatal hernias are big enough to allow undigested food and stomach acids to reflux into your oesophagus. This means that you’re likely to display the standard symptoms of GERD. 

Symptom relief

Eat smaller, more frequent meals

Get yourself a Acid Reflux Wedge Pillow to elevate the upper half of your body to prevent acid leaking out of your stomach

Change your lifestyle. Eating healthier, exercising more, reduce or stop smoking and alcohol

Find a way to relax that works for you, putting yourself first to reduce stress and anxiety